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Welcome to the Cholmondeley Cricket Club Website
Cholmondeley CC

THE HISTORY OF CHOLMONDELEY CRICKET CLUB
The cricket ground is situated in the grounds of Cholmondeley Castle in South Cheshire and has been owned by successive generations of the Cholmondeley family.
It was founded on 29th May 1886 after a meeting at the then Cholmondeley School . The Club initially revolved around the employees and tenants of the Cholmondeley Estate.
When the Club first started there was no changing accommodation for the players who presumably arrived already attired for cricket. This was so until 1924 when Lady Cholmondeley presented a gift of a tent which was erected under the oak tree on the side of the ground nearest to the castle. This was the changing facility until 1928 when the then Marquis of Cholmondeley provided the greater part of the funds for the erection of a pavilion(with a thatched roof) built over the mere and is still used as a tea room on match days. The roof remained thatched until it was replaced with a tiled roof in 1967. In 1975 the Club erected the present pavilion with money raised from loans, debentures and a grant obtained from the National Playing fields Association. Since that time this pavilion has been improved and extended to provide a larger bar area, larger changing rooms and improved shower and toilet facilities.
Prior to 1938 there was no permanent fence around the ground, with the cricket square being enclosed by iron hurdles to protect it from cows and sheep. These hurdles were removed before the start of a match and replaced at the conclusion. They were placed in four stacks on the boundary and if struck by the ball 4 runs were awarded. The permanent fence was erected in 1948 with timber provided by the Estate. In more recent times part of this boundary fence have been repositioned to give a larger playing area.
The first sight screens were erected in 1949 and the first concrete practice wicket in 1950. Since then the sight screens have been added to and the Club now has two practice nets with artificial surfaces built with the help of a Lottery grant. The Club also has excellent covers built mainly from funds provided by some Club members.
The Club’s most famous “old boy” is the celebrated best selling author Dick Francis who was a playing member in the 40s and 50s. He became champion jockey and jockey to Her Majesty the Queen Mother and in that famous Grand National of 1956 was robbed of victory in the last 20 yards when Devon Loch collapsed for no apparent reason.
The Club celebrated its centenary in 1986 with a week of cricket matches and social events between the 6th and 13th July.
In the early years the Club played friendly matches and first experienced league cricket in 1971 when joining the Cheshire Conference. In 1974 the Club became a founder member of the Cheshire Cricket League where it remained until 1997. In 1998 the Club was invited to join the Cheshire County League which was accepted after a great deal of thought and discussion. The time in the Cheshire League was a rather mixed one playing in both Division 1 and Division 2, with one major success when the second X1 won their League title in 1986.
The start of the new century was not a good time for the Club as it experienced relegation from the County league back to the Cheshire League Division 1 and then to Division 2. However in 2004 the Club started its revival with the 2nd X1 gaining promotion to Division 1. 2005 was without doubt the most successful in recent times with the 1st X1 winning the Division 2 title and promotion to Division 1 and the 2nd X1 winning the Division 1 title.
The past five years has seen both success and disappointment and the 2011 season starts with the 1st XI in Division 2 and the 2nd XI in Division A of the Meller Braggins League.
2011 sees us celebrate our 125th Anniversary.
Much has been written about the beauty of the ground and its stunning location with Cholmondeley Castle acting as a spectacular backdrop. The Club is very much indebted to the Cholmondeley family for allowing them to play within the grounds of the Castle.


CHOLMONDELEY CRICKET CLUB CLUB EQUITY STATEMENT

Cholmondeley Cricket Club is committed to ensuring that sportsmanship and fairness is incorporated across all aspects of its development. In doing so the Club acknowledges and adopts the Sport England definition of sports equity.

Sports equity is about fairness in sport., equality of access, recognising inequalities and taking steps to address them. It is about changing the culture and structure of sport to ensure it becomes equally accessible to everyone in society.

The Club respects the rights, dignity and worth of every person and will treat everyone equally within the context of their sport regardless of age, ability, gender, race, ethnicity, religious belief, sexuality or social/economic status.

The Club is committed to everyone having the right to enjoy the sport in an environment free from intimidation, harassment and abuse.

All Club members have a responsibility to oppose discriminatory behaviour and to promote equality of opportunity.corporated across all aspects of its development. In doing so the Club acknowledges and adopts the Sport England definition of sports equity. Sports equity is about fairness in sport., equality of access, recognising inequalities and taking steps to address them. It is about changing the culture and structure of sport to ensure it becomes equally accessible to everyone in society. The Club respects the rights, dignity and worth of every person and will treat everyone equally within the context of their sport regardless of age, ability, gender, race, ethnicity, religious belief, sexuality or social/economic status. The Club is committed to everyone having the right to enjoy the sport in an environment free from intimidation, harassment and abuse. All Club members have a responsibility to oppose discriminatory behaviour and to promote equality of opportunity.